Media Images

A collection of images of Sharp Edge Labs technology for use by the media.

Left panel shows cells before stimulation, middle panel shows cell after stimulation, right panel shows repainting the cells to clearly differentiate cell surface receptors (green) from receptor that's been driven inside the cell by stimuatlion (red).  The receptor we're tracking is the CXCR4 receptor that HIV uses to enter neurons, leading to HIV-neurodegeneration.  With these tools we can visualize the process directly and search for drugs that block entry.

 

Left panel shows cells before stimulation, middle panel shows cell after stimulation, right panel shows repainting the cells to clearly differentiate cell surface receptors (green) from receptor that's been driven inside the cell by stimuatlion (red).  The receptor tracked in this case is ADBR2.  Binding and release of epinephrine and norepinephrine, the natural ligands on the ADBR2 receptor, regulates cardiac, pulmonary, vascular, immunologic, and metabolic functions. The beta-2-adrenergic receptors are the targets of beta-agonist drugs. ADRB2 appears to be one of the multiple genetic players in asthma, vascular disease, and obesity.